EAP

These posts directly involve ideas, discussion, lessons, etc. within an English for Academic Purposes teaching and learning context.

ARC in practicum

EDIT: This is the first ever appearance of Academic Reading Circles online. Some information, including roles, have been since update in the book. Click here to see. If you use any information from this post, related ARC posts linked below, slideshares, or the book itself, please attribute it to Tyson Seburn, with a link to the related post, presentation, or book. Thank you!

A post ago, I showed the theory behind an academic adaptation to the model of literature circles, with a couple of handouts and videos thrown in there. A handful of teachers delighted me with their ‘successful’ subsequent uses , so I thought it might be useful (and fun) to show a practical example of my week’s Academic Reading Circle (ARC) with students not yet adept at the roles.Read More »ARC in practicum

Academic reading circles (ARC): The first ARC appearance ever

EDIT: This is the first ever appearance of Academic Reading Circles online. Some information, including roles, have been since updated in the book. Click here to see. If you use any information from this post, related ARC posts linked below, slideshares, or the book itself, please attribute it to Tyson Seburn, with a link to the related post, presentation, or book. Thank you!

My students very often tend to do the required course readings once, struggling not only with comprehension, but also relating the content from week to week. In order to both improve comprehension and dig deeper, this post is about pushing students to engage with the readings.  Read More »Academic reading circles (ARC): The first ARC appearance ever

My toaster doesn’t make coffee either

It’s a national holiday in Canada, Canada Day, and I am working at the university.  Despite this, I wanted to share with you a post by Danika Barker, an Ontario teacher at my former high school, entitled My Toaster is Broken: An Analogy about the Current State of Education.  Danika is witty, insightful (check out these analogies) and integrates blogs, nings and other tech tools with her classes.  Plus, she’s been “putting the racy in literacy since 2008”–with this paragon of characteristics, who could resist a new follow?Read More »My toaster doesn’t make coffee either